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BD reviews: The Bourne Identity, The Bourne Supremacy, The Bourne Ultimatum

Blu-ray Blu-ray Blu-ray

A little while back, Universal sent me check discs for their recent UK Blu-ray Disc releases of the three Jason Bourne movies, The Bourne Identity, The Bourne Supremacy and The Bourne Ultimatum. They seem to want the discs back but neglected to provide me with a return address, and in any event, they’ve been available on store shelves for long enough for me to suspect that there’s not much point in them having them returned.

That’s what I’m hoping at any rate, because the image quality of all three films have been improved over their HD DVD counterparts, and it would suit me very well to be able to hang on to them. The Bourne Supremacy sees the biggest improvement and The Bourne Ultimatum the least, with The Bourne Identity lying somewhere in the middle. In each case, the improvement seems to have come from the improved disc capacity and bandwidth of Blu-ray over HD DVD, resulting in fewer compression artefacts and a more natural reproduction of the film grain. The Bourne Identity is still the weakest-looking overall and The Bourne Ultimatum the best, but all three are a testament to the improvements that can be made when a studio harnesses improved technical specifications to provide the audience with a better viewing experience. (Warner, take note.)

The first two films also gain a lossless audio track each (The Bourne Ultimatum’s HD DVD had a lossless track to begin with), and while I couldn’t discern any difference between the lossy HD DVD and lossless BD tracks for The Bourne Supremacy (despite several blind tests), The Bourne Identity seems to get a little moore “oomph” in the bass. It’s extremely difficult to objectively compare sound, but as you probably know, I’m more than a little suspicious of those who claim that the difference between lossy and lossless audio is “night and day”, believing that it’s far more important to get yourself a decent sound system (well, okay, I have my brother and his meaty speakers to thank for that). I’m not saying I don’t think lossless audio should be used whenever possible - just that I think some people have a tendency to claim they hear a difference when there isn’t one there.

Anyway, check out the links below to read about each disc in more depth.

 
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 at 6:00 PM | Comments: 3
Categories: Blu-ray | Cinema | HD DVD | Reviews

 
Comments

1.

Whiggles,

Thanks for coming up with another faithful review.

Please clarify on the below:

"On the downside, this UK release features generic player-generated location type and subtitles for the non-English dialogue, whereas burned-in text and correct typefaces used for the US version. A similar problem affects The Bourne Ultimatum."

Also, could you please confirm if Bourne Identity BD features the extended dinner conversation scene at the farmhouse which was exclusive to the international cut of the film.

Posted by: Lgans316, April 20, 2009 10:36 PM

2.

Please clarify on the below:

“On the downside, this UK release features generic player-generated location type and subtitles for the non-English dialogue, whereas burned-in text and correct typefaces used for the US version. A similar problem affects The Bourne Ultimatum.”

Sorry, that should read:

“On the downside, this UK release features generic player-generated location type and subtitles for the non-English dialogue, unlike the original burned-in text and correct typefaces used for the US version. A similar problem affects The Bourne Ultimatum.”

Also, could you please confirm if Bourne Identity BD features the extended dinner conversation scene at the farmhouse which was exclusive to the international cut of the film.

To be honest, I don’t know. What does the extra footage in the international cut of this scene consist of?

Posted by: Michael Mackenzie, April 20, 2009 10:49 PM

3.

it's nice to have my suspicions about the typeface of the onscreen text confirmed, having recenly watched the Australian DVD of Ultimatum.

made it especially weird, and the only reason I noticed the alteration, when the sound effect for the text appearing was still on the soundtrack, yet the way the text appears clearly doesn't match it.

makes you wonder whether the director's of films that are altered in this way for home video release are aware that the changes have been made. it really alters the intended presentation.
though in this case no where near as much as the original R1 DVD of THE TERMINATOR, where scrolling text was replaced with static subtitles (at least that one was remastered to fix the change)

Posted by: Adam Grikepelis, April 21, 2009 5:40 PM

Comments on this entry and all entries up to and including June 31st 2009 have been closed. The discussion continues on the new Land of Whimsy blog:

http://www.landofwhimsy.com

 

 
 
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